Butterfly by Sonya Hartnet (Miles Franklin Shortlisted)

Butterfly- Sonya Hartnett

Butterfly centers around the maturation of 14 year old Plum, who is so desperate for strength, courage and acceptance that she does something that seems strange and disturbing to her friends. Her schoolfriends hover between accepting and hating her throughout the book, and Plum is taken under the wing of her neighbour, Maureen. It is through Maureen’s four year old son, David, however that Plum finds her real voice. The contact with someone more innocent and in need of protection than her wrenches Plum briefly from the despairing self-centredness of her generation.

Thought the tone is immature in the sections which are from Plum’s perspective, there are also chapters which are very adult. Harnett manages the jump well, making this a good book for teens beginning to cross over into adult reading (from 14-18 depending on the sophistication of the reader). As usual, there is a poisonous undercurrent to the world Hartnett has created, and Plum is trapped in a series of bitter and angry relationships with friends, family and mentor. There’s not a lot of hope in this book, but a lot of it might help teenaged girls to understand both themselves at that stage of life and the adults that are dealing with them.

The writing is biting and fast, and even though there is not much happening action-wise, there is so much transformation occurring in Plum’s head, where it really matters.

The side story, which quickly blows up into the main complication is that of Plum’s much older brother, who is entangled in a relationship with married Maureen which is becoming more and more difficult to keep secret. There is something flawed about Maureen which insinuates itself at the beginning of the novel (when she tells Plum that to lose weight she should just throw her school lunches in the bin), but which only becomes truly apparent at the conclusion. There is a danger to her which threatens Plum more than her friends do, and which drives the tension of the story.

I really enjoyed Butterfly if only for an insight into an age group which I’ve almost entirely forgotten. It’s enjoyable for the same reasons that Prep by Curtis Sittenfeld, or any other boarding school type novel is: you know the cattiness is coming, but not from which direction, or whether the protagonist will crumble or rise because of it.



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~ by ConsanguineousMind on June 8, 2010.

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